PDA

View Full Version : Electricity or LPG for Cooking - Which is better?


houseband
06-29-2007, 09:38 AM
Just a quick question that has bugged me for several years:

which is better to use in cooking for a small family?

LPG or electricity in terms of:

a. cost efficiency (high-electricity rates vs erratic LPG prices)
b. safety (i live in a townhouse and kitchen is beside a small lightwell, very limited area)
c. carbon-footprint (in this era of global-warming, environmentalism, etc, it does not hurt to care a little, di ba?)

will appreciate any comments and suggestions.

thanks!

2diy4
06-29-2007, 09:56 AM
Perhaps other members can comment on the cost efficiency and safety. What I know is that if everyone starts to use electricity to cook, that will really increas e the load requirement on napocor and the IPPs. As it is now, they are hard pressed to meet the demand. Building new powerplants will be expensive and will certainly be passed on to us the consumers.

As far as carbon footprint is concerned, my intuitive take is that the LPG system will likely have lower CO2 emissions than an electric system, provided that the electricity is generated in thermal plants. A btu from LPG and a btu from electricity is the same. What is different is bringing the BTU to the electric hot plate and to the LPG burner.

An LPG burner will be very efficient, however, there will be some energy expended bringing the LPG to your house. However, converting heat to electricity at the powerplant will likely be much less than 100%, and there will also be transmission line losses. The utilities are allowed around 10% in system losses, the bulk of which are lost in terms of heat as electricity travels the transmission wire.

Of course, hydroelectric and geothermal electricity will have little or no carbon emissions. So we have to factor in the generation mix in determining which has the lower carbon footprint.

nicolodeon
06-30-2007, 09:43 PM
I use LPG mostly because it has lower CO2 emmissions unlike electric stoves. It also saves me money on electricity. Also, the LPG stove can churn out heat faster than any electric stove.

On weekends, we use a charcoal/wood burning stove that I made. It saves us on LPG costs. I think it also makes food taste better, especially jasmin rice cooked inside a traditional palayok.

houseband
06-30-2007, 10:27 PM
thank you 2diy4 and nicolodeon.

i guess LPG it is. i just hav to convince the wife about the safety of LPG-powered stoves. she seems to have this phobia against LPG, hearing the news and stories of exploding leaking tubes and exploding LPG tanks.

ronfer2001
07-01-2007, 04:52 AM
Any heaters or coolers consume high electrical power... I go for the LPG...

I'll just make sure my tank storage is well ventilated to free and dilute in air incase it leaks...

2diy4
07-01-2007, 06:28 AM
Remember that LPG is heavier than air. It will collect in the lowest parts of the house, rather than dissipating in the air unlike LNG (liquified natural gas) which is what malampaya produces.

LPG is naturally odorless, but the petroleum companies mix it with a distinct smell to warn homeowners about leaks. Just keep a keen nose, and when you smell LPG, open windows and doors. Never use a match to look for the leak. :)

junn2006
07-01-2007, 05:08 PM
abt lpg leaks. it would be better to periodically checkhoses n connections. you can also replace it every 2-3yrs.

hoses arent that expensive...

happy_gilmore
07-01-2007, 07:41 PM
Just a quick question that has bugged me for several years:

which is better to use in cooking for a small family?

LPG or electricity in terms of:

a. cost efficiency (high-electricity rates vs erratic LPG prices)
b. safety (i live in a townhouse and kitchen is beside a small lightwell, very limited area)
c. carbon-footprint (in this era of global-warming, environmentalism, etc, it does not hurt to care a little, di ba?)

will appreciate any comments and suggestions.

thanks!


we have two stoves here at home... one is electrically powered, while the other is lpg-based.

in terms of efficiency and consumption, when we are using the electrical-based stove, our energy consumption averages around 1000-1500 pesos more every month, while one 16 kg tank of lpg, which costs around 500 pesos, lasts us for around 2 months.

what i would advise though is for you to periodically check the condition of your hose as well as your regulator, just to be safe. and make sure that the location of the lpg is located in a ventilated place, where air can circulate.

peklat
07-02-2007, 01:05 AM
wala akong makitang basehan ... dahil obvious naman na in terms of cost efficiency... siyempre sa lpg ako.... kaya lang may mga gamit or very usefull sila parehas.....

ex: may bigla kang bisita.....(sunday).... family time di ba? nagluluto ka at biglang naubos ang laman ng lpg mo(if ever iyun ang gamit mo)... well ano ang gagawin mo.... tatakbo ka sa store para bumili... eh sunday.... baka sarado ang store.... so what you will do... turn on you electric stove and.... wala"".... may heating element ka na para makapagluto without any problem at all..... nasa sa ito how often you want to used your electric..... di ba ???? self dicipline.....

tatoski
08-15-2007, 06:04 PM
Not counting hydroelectric power plants, almost all power comes from heat. Heat comes from geothermal or by burning a fuel such as coal or bunker or wood or by nuclear. In the our country, I think most of the power still comes from thermal power plants that burn coal. The heat is converted into steam and steam drives the turbines and the turbines drive the generator. The generator produces power and this power is transmitted thru high tension wires for hundreds or even thousands of kilometers. This power is converted back to heat by using your stove. See the long chain of conversion? LPG in your tank is burned directly to produce heat. single conversion. If my memory serves me right only 30% of the heat from the coal or bunker is ultimately converted to electricity. Add another 10% transmission losses then power gets to your doorstep so only about 27% of the original heat gets to you in the form of the highest order, electricity! So what does this translate to? Electricity is so pure and perfect to convert back to heat. It is also expensive! Better use lpg for heating purposes.

Using electricity for cooking will also require good and capable wiring system at home. A range will require about 5 to 20KW of power. Is your house system designed for this? Ranges also heat up slower and if the pan is not flat only radiant heat is used. A lot of heat escapes.

For LPG users make sure room is well ventilated and for condo dwellers better use LPG alarms to warn you of leaks.

Buy LPG from reputable sources not from the fly by night dealers that use dilapidated tanks. These tanks are pressure vessels and should be treated like one.

I'll go for LPG anytime.

VtEC
08-16-2007, 04:12 AM
i think it's better to have them both.just incase you ran out of lpg you still have your electric stove while if there is power failure, you still have your lpg ;D

Raisedroof!
08-16-2007, 05:10 PM
Hi, I just noticed that nobody has yet espoused the benefits of cooking using our modern electric appliances. It seems almost everybody are convinced absolutely about LPG. But are you still using LPG to cook your rice? to heat water for your coffee? or to grill your meat?
Just because fire, using LPG, is directly under your pot does not mean that heat from such fire are not wasted. In fact, you can put your hand near it and feel how heat are wasted just as much as those used up in the pot. That chemical energy of gases being converted into heat energy through combustion is also wasted during such process of conversion(as in LPG), just as elecrical energy wasted when converted into heat energy (as in electric stove) because both have to contend with some heat transfer dynamics, from heat source to the pot and food in it, not to mention losses in the generation of both medium. LPGas are lost in refilling a tank, in transporting, or while in storage, just as electricity are lost in transmission, in transformers, in faulty connectors, etc.. Both have their advantage/disadvantage but the question is whether which one can better serve modern man.
Since electric appliance is the later invention to introduce safety and convenience in the modern kitchen, I would say electric stove are better. It is just unfortunate that the cost of electricity in this country, unlike in most modern countries, is higher, which puts 3rd world countries, and the rural kitchen, for that matter, at a disadvantage.

VtEC
08-16-2007, 09:18 PM
case to case basis yan bro.ofcourse for those who can afford to have the likes of rice cooker, coffee maker, oven, and the likes will say they prepare the electric but for those who cant, well, they still prepare the lpg.

Raisedroof!
08-23-2007, 05:25 PM
8)Of course, everybody understands that the extra safety and convenience that electricity can provide, necessarily mean additional financial burden. Just as modern feature-packed cars are more expensive than older and less fitted cars. As nothing can be had in this world for free. But having them both, means having the best of both worlds. Do you agree?

VtEC
08-23-2007, 11:21 PM
yup. that's what iv'e said on my previous post.

fake_silhouette
07-16-2010, 08:33 AM
by better what do you mean?

LPG is cheaper and is used by most people
Elec is more expensive and is used by less people

LPG has more people who can fix
Elec has less people who can fix

LPG can cause fire (leaks) so more hazardous
Elec can cause fire (improper wirings) so less hazardous (not for old establishments)

LPG runs out and needs to be replaced (you can't buy LPGs whenever wherever
Elec is postpaid (but would not work if there's no power)

LPG has more fakes and imitation
Elec has less fakes and imitation (i don't think there is even one but i can't be too sure can I)

LPG can be misused by children more (highten the stove?)
Elec can be misused by children less (you can easily put up a breaker though)
*they are both dangerous if played at though

anyway my point is
there is no perfect tool / machine / people / whatever
everything has its pros and cons
so think of something that best fits your needs
________
Ship Sale (http://ship-sale.com/)

kchan
09-04-2010, 01:06 PM
guys, when u say electric vs lpg.. kasama ba dyan yung electric stove na ceramic top. may alam po ba kayo regarding this kind of stove compare to lpg?

joey81
09-04-2010, 05:25 PM
We went for the Imarflex induction cooktop, but we had to do some calculations before making the final decision.

Our average consumption is one 11kg LPG tank per month. The energy density of LPG is 46.44 megajoules per kg. Thats a total of 510.84 mj per tank. I've read gas stoves are only 40% efficient, meaning only that percentage of the energy actually goes into the food you are cooking. The other 60% is dissipated unused in your kitchen.

<I'll split this into several posts, para maka-post na ako ng link later>

joey81
09-04-2010, 05:36 PM
So we are actually using only 204.34 mj for our cooking.

Punta tayo sa electricity. 1 kWh is 3.6mj. Induction cooktops
is 84% to 90% efficient. Lets take the conservative side. 204.34/0.84 = 243.26.

We will consume 243.26 mj or 67.57 kWh if we used the induction stove.

joey81
09-04-2010, 05:41 PM
Based on our latest electric bill, Meralco is effectively charging us P11.46 per kWh. So that's 774.53 petot!

joey81
09-04-2010, 05:54 PM
And yung latest purchase namin ng LPG (yes, we need it pag brownout) is only P575.

Waaaahhh!!! Lugi na pala ako at today's Meralco rates. :'(

Sa computation namin two years ago mas mura pag induction.

joey81
09-04-2010, 06:07 PM
Pwede na pala akong mag-post ng link.

kWh to joules (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilowatt_hour)

Induction stove efficiency (http://theinductionsite.com/manuals/cookgtsd.pdf)

LPG (propane) energy density (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Energy_content)

How induction works (http://theinductionsite.com/how-induction-works.shtml)

AFAIK, induction is the most energy efficient cooktop, because heat is generated by the pot/pan itself. There is no radiant heat lost from the stovetop, no matter the size of your cookware.

@kchan, I don't know yet what is the efficiency of the ceramic hob, but I'm pretty sure mas makakatipid ka pa rin pag LPG.

kchan
09-04-2010, 06:13 PM
@joey boss thanks sa explanation mo. yan pala ung iniisip ko induction nasa dulo na nang dila ko kanina hindi ko lang maalala. anyways thanks very much sa explanation mo, so ill go for lpg parin.

sa charcoal vs lpg naman, based sa observation ko mas mura parin lpg, kasi walang control ang heat nang charcoal and matagal, magpapabaga ka pa hehehe

joey81
09-05-2010, 09:53 AM
You're welcome!

BTW, depending on your place, you might need to consider where the 60% goes.

If you live in a condo that 60% heats up your room and will give extra load to your aircon. That's 306.5 megajoules of heat (assuming 1 tank per month).

I don't know how efficient air conditioners are but lets assume it consumes 1joule per joule of energy removed from the room:

306.5 / 3.6 = 85.14kWh

That's 957 pesos spent getting rid of unused heat! Way much more than the ~200 pesos na natipid mo if using LPG instead of induction.

kchan
09-06-2010, 09:53 AM
ok naman, normal kitchen na napakainit din pag nag cook dahil kulang sa ventilation.

what about ung lpg stove saver something na nabibili sa mga tyangge stores, ung bilog na may wire mesh. do u guys consider na this really works? i tried this before mukhang ok naman dahil mas nakakafocus ung fire but i dont know if it really works dahil hindi ko mamomonitor, madami kasing nagamit nang stove

Neo
03-09-2011, 04:56 PM
Pwede na pala akong mag-post ng link.

kWh to joules (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilowatt_hour)

Induction stove efficiency (http://theinductionsite.com/manuals/cookgtsd.pdf)

LPG (propane) energy density (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propane#Energy_content)

How induction works (http://theinductionsite.com/how-induction-works.shtml)

AFAIK, induction is the most energy efficient cooktop, because heat is generated by the pot/pan itself. There is no radiant heat lost from the stovetop, no matter the size of your cookware.

@kchan, I don't know yet what is the efficiency of the ceramic hob, but I'm pretty sure mas makakatipid ka pa rin pag LPG.


whew! grabe, sir joey. talagang pinag-aralan mo to. parang thesis ah! :D kidding aside, i'm glad you posted this information, and your personal experience and calculations. i myself has been considering getting a pair of single plate induction cooker, when i move to my new house. i've heard so much about its efficiency and it being an energy saver. though i didn't do calculations like you did. but, after reading your post, i think i'd better change my plans, and consider LPG stove again.

my plan is to really have my kitchen/cooking appliances running on electricity (no LPG) like the rice cooker/steamer/poacher, blender, oven, toaster, microwave oven, coffee maker, juicer, etc.

should i also do cost and energy calculations on these appliances so that i'd know which i should prioritize?

Neo
03-09-2011, 04:58 PM
And yung latest purchase namin ng LPG (yes, we need it pag brownout) is only P575.

Waaaahhh!!! Lugi na pala ako at today's Meralco rates. :'(

Sa computation namin two years ago mas mura pag induction.


sir joey, yung price ng LPG ngayon is about php677 na. mas tipid pa din ba ang LPG?

balarila
03-09-2011, 08:30 PM
Let me get into this fray from a different perspective: cooking.

I like to cook and, for range top cooking, it's LPG for me, hands down. I find LPG much easier to control than electricity. I look at the flame, turn the knob until it's the right size and cook. I also like the instant heat of a flame as opposed to waiting for the coil to heat up. I find LPG just much more convenient and controllable.

Now, that's for the cooking range. When it comes to the oven, I prefer electric. I feel confident that the thermostat of the oven can regulate more effectively the heat than LPG. So it's electric for me when I bake or roast. But whenever I can, charcoal is best.

For water heating, nothing beats the electric pot. In fact, when I cook something soupy, I heat up water in the electric pot which is what I use in adjusting water in what i'm cooking. Fast.

BTW, I have three LPG tanks at home: 2 duty and 1 standby, so we never run out.

joey81
03-09-2011, 09:19 PM
sir joey, yung price ng LPG ngayon is about php677 na. mas tipid pa din ba ang LPG?

An 11-kg tank of LPG is equivalent to 67.57 kWh of electricity. According to my last month's bill, Meralco charged me P10.33 per kWh.

That's P698.xx, mas mura pa rin LPG by a bit.

Considering the "green" points of induction: zero emission, minimal excess heat, no soot in my walls/ceilings, sulit pa rin para sa akin.

Sana lang bigyan tayo ng incentives ng gov't for using energy efficient appliances.

Neo
03-09-2011, 09:48 PM
An 11-kg tank of LPG is equivalent to 67.57 kWh of electricity. According to my last month's bill, Meralco charged me P10.33 per kWh.

That's P698.xx, mas mura pa rin LPG by a bit.

Considering the "green" points of induction: zero emission, minimal excess heat, no soot in my walls/ceilings, sulit pa rin para sa akin.

Sana lang bigyan tayo ng incentives ng gov't for using energy efficient appliances.

ambilis! computed agad! siguro quiz bee champ ka nung estudyante ka, sir joey. :D thanks.

and since my meralco bills (and other bills and groceries) are enrolled in my citibank cash back card, i'll get 5% rebate. so assuming that's php698, i'll just be paying php663, a bit lower than the current price of an 11-kg LPG tank which is php677. pwede na din pala ang induction cooker. :D

yep, the green points of induction cookers are also some of the reasons i was thinking of getting it. sana merong promo ang government like the palit CFLs last year. parang "trade your old gas stove with a single plate induction cooker".

sir joey, yung induction cooker mo is imarflex. ok kaya ang dowell brand? there are only 3 brands of single coil induction cookers at appliance stores - dowell, imarflex, philips. dowell is the least expensive at php1,200. ung coffee maker ko is a dowell brand. sya lang kasi ang metal thermal jug. yoko kasi glass. so far, ok naman. ala akong problema sa dowell coffee maker ko. dowell is under kolin.

at why do multiple coil induction cookers cost much much more than the single coil?

teka, O/T na yata ako... mods, ok lang kung kelangang imoderate ang post kong ito. :)

Neo
03-09-2011, 10:02 PM
Let me get into this fray from a different perspective: cooking.

I like to cook and, for range top cooking, it's LPG for me, hands down. I find LPG much easier to control than electricity. I look at the flame, turn the knob until it's the right size and cook. I also like the instant heat of a flame as opposed to waiting for the coil to heat up. I find LPG just much more convenient and controllable.

Now, that's for the cooking range. When it comes to the oven, I prefer electric. I feel confident that the thermostat of the oven can regulate more effectively the heat than LPG. So it's electric for me when I bake or roast. But whenever I can, charcoal is best.

For water heating, nothing beats the electric pot. In fact, when I cook something soupy, I heat up water in the electric pot which is what I use in adjusting water in what i'm cooking. Fast.

BTW, I have three LPG tanks at home: 2 duty and 1 standby, so we never run out.

yep. i agree with sir balarila. this should also be looked from the side of cooking. the ease of cooking.

i also prefer electric oven over gas oven. madaling icontrol ang temp. sa gas kasi, minsan hindi pantay ang luto ko.

and syempre mas madaling mag-init ng food sa microwave oven kesa sa kalan. mas madali ding magluto ng personal pizzas in an oven toaster kesa sa gas oven. i'm fond of making pizzas from leftover bread and meat dishes. plus spaghetti sauce at quick melt cheese lang, pizza in just a few minutes. :)

jarod
03-09-2011, 11:00 PM
Let me get into this fray from a different perspective: cooking.

I like to cook and, for range top cooking, it's LPG for me, hands down. I find LPG much easier to control than electricity. I look at the flame, turn the knob until it's the right size and cook. I also like the instant heat of a flame as opposed to waiting for the coil to heat up. I find LPG just much more convenient and controllable.

Now, that's for the cooking range. When it comes to the oven, I prefer electric. I feel confident that the thermostat of the oven can regulate more effectively the heat than LPG. So it's electric for me when I bake or roast. But whenever I can, charcoal is best.

For water heating, nothing beats the electric pot. In fact, when I cook something soupy, I heat up water in the electric pot which is what I use in adjusting water in what i'm cooking. Fast.

BTW, I have three LPG tanks at home: 2 duty and 1 standby, so we never run out.
Amen to this, same same same preference!

violaine
03-10-2011, 06:57 AM
BTW, I have three LPG tanks at home: 2 duty and 1 standby, so we never run out.


there must be a lot of heads within the household i guess...hehe..i only have one on duty and another on standby..why is it that shellane costs more than the regular ones..i havent really checked but someone told me the tank of shellane is a lot bigger than island gas or another...a tank i remember cost me 780p...agh!

i was actually intending to add an induction cooktop but most of our pots
have rounded bottoms...upgrading kaserolas for this purpose is also expensive kasi.

perhaps never will come a time for the philippines to have a centralized gas supply..metered.

the two cents is...get the best of all worlds of induction, electric and gas.

:p

....thanks for the computation btw..i never checked it though..i am simply dumb in math. :(

joey81
03-10-2011, 07:35 AM
...but most of our pots
have rounded bottoms...upgrading kaserolas for this purpose is also expensive kasi.


My cooktop came with an "adapter" to prevent round-bottomed pans from rolling/tilting. The real problem is not the shape but the material the pots/pans are made of. Most of the cookware sold locally are made of aluminum. To work with induction the cookware has to be ferromagnetic (dapat dumidikit ang magnet) which aluminum is not. :(

You can opt for an interface disc to be able to use your legacy cookware:
http://www.amazon.com/Max-Burton-6010-Induction-Heat-Proof/dp/B00213L3PK

Medyo mahal sa Amazon. Maybe the bakal boys know where to source something like this inexpensively. The downside of an interface disc is the inefficient heat transfer from the disc to the cookware. Baka mas mainam pa kung conventional electric cooktop na lang.



....thanks for the computation btw..i never checked it though..i am simply dumb in math. :(

no prob. ;)

natflores
05-30-2012, 03:27 PM
Kung cost ang pag uusapan mas tipid ung lpg. Mejo mataas kasi ung singil ng kuryente ngaun.
Posted via PHM Mobile

zepol
05-30-2012, 11:03 PM
they use gas in iron chef...
Posted via PHM Mobile

Nelson de Leon
06-24-2012, 09:56 PM
I'd prefer LPG for cooking. Ako personally, i use a high pressure stove for special cooking.

ramsey
07-22-2012, 10:46 PM
Sa LPG ako. Kasi mababa ngayon..

pyth
07-23-2012, 12:25 AM
Electricity using induction stove :
Studies shows 85% of electrica; energy were converted to heat using induction thus 85% effeciency
whereas for LPG only 40% generated were converted into heat thus loss of 60%...therefore consumption cost would be offset by effeciency itself.:thanks:

willy1467
07-23-2012, 12:42 PM
Can I use my existing cooking utensils (pots, pans, woks) or do I have to buy another that is suited for an induction cooker?:confused:

joey81
07-23-2012, 01:43 PM
Can I use my existing cooking utensils (pots, pans, woks) or do I have to buy another that is suited for an induction cooker?:confused:

Aluminum and copper pans won't work with induction. It has to be ferromagnetic. Stainless steel is good.

You can use a magnet to check. If a magnet sticks to the bottom of the pot/pan, then you're good.

Nelson de Leon
07-23-2012, 01:56 PM
Aluminum and copper pans won't work with induction. It has to be ferromagnetic. Stainless steel is good.

You can use a magnet to check. If a magnet sticks to the bottom of the pot/pan, then you're good.

The "stickier" the magnet, the better. IMHO, there are stainless steel pots etc that are "weak" sa magnet.

joey81
07-23-2012, 02:34 PM
The "stickier" the magnet, the better. IMHO, there are stainless steel pots etc that are "weak" sa magnet.

Agree! This is an indication of how much is the iron content of the cookware.

To be more exact, it is not really the magnetic property of the pot or pan that is important. The induction stove produces a magnetic field that oscillates at 24kHz. This alternating magnetic field induces an "eddy current" on the metal cookware, whether its stainless steel or aluminum.

Now the eddy currents encounters electrical resistance in the metal, thereby producing heat. The electrical resistance of aluminum is too low to produce significant heat for cooking, unlike iron.

This problem with aluminum can be overcome by increasing the frequency of the magnetic field to several megahertz. However, this is too expensive to economically implement using today's technology.

bmac
07-23-2012, 04:50 PM
based on experience. teflon coated pans will not work on induction

joey81
07-23-2012, 05:02 PM
based on experience. teflon coated pans will not work on induction

Most teflon-coated pans are made of aluminum. I searched far and wide to find one with a stainless-steel base.

Now that pan is under lock and key. No one else uses it but me. :cool:

butch11a
07-23-2012, 05:57 PM
i just recently got an induction cooker and most of my cookware also doesn't work, but i found a product called an induction plate, its a round iron disc with handle that you put between the induction stove and your aluminum or stainless cookware and its the one that gets hot, might not be as efficient as an induction pan or pot but at least it works... an alternative would be a large round flat sizzling plate between the pan and induction stove, works the same way....tried it already...hth

Nelson de Leon
07-24-2012, 12:50 AM
i just recently got an induction cooker and most of my cookware also doesn't work, but i found a product called an induction plate, its a round iron disc with handle that you put between the induction stove and your aluminum or stainless cookware and its the one that gets hot, might not be as efficient as an induction pan or pot but at least it works... an alternative would be a large round flat sizzling plate between the pan and induction stove, works the same way....tried it already...hth

Ok yan sir. But try to consider din yun loss ng energy. Efficient yun induction stove from induction stove to round iron disc. Pero transfer of heat from round iron disc to your cookware, nanjan ang loss. It does work pero yun "tipid" or "efficiency" nawawala. it might defeat the purpose of using the induction stove as an energy efficient equipment.

Just my dos centavos lang sir.

Baka you're better off in investing at least a cookware that's induction stove "friendly".

@sir Joey81: May ceramic din na teflon coated. both my wife and i use our teflon pans. Pero IMHO, nothing beats my good old chinese wok paired with high pressure stove. Matrabaho lang after use kasi you need to seasoning it pero matsalap.

archie013
07-26-2012, 02:21 AM
kami po LPG ang gamit.. taas kasi sa kuryente nung electric eh (we read the watts dun sa label niya) we only buy LPG sa shell or petron.. sabi nila pag di daw kasi branded minsan kulang at di safe.. :) I tried cooking sa uling gamit ung parang kalan na gawa sa semento.. lupit din! mas tipid pa.. dali magpabaga tsaka lakas ng apoy! :) medyo hassle lng kasi sa garahe nakalagay.. maglalakad ka pa papunta sa kusina hehe

violaine
07-26-2012, 10:14 AM
if you like quality of life, it will be expensive...

you have got to have the best of both worlds..

but my bottom line is...id still go for the gas...mas homey pag me nakikita akong apoy sa ilalim ng pots ko...in that way i can manipulate the knob to control the fire.

sa electric, hindi ako masaya with just three settings...low medium hi...

dapat sa thread na ito...ibaon na sa limot!

V

angeljolie
07-26-2012, 12:30 PM
^Wag naman po natin ibaon sa limot ang thread. It's very informative hehe.

I'm going back to LPG after a year of using induction stove. Madali uminit ang induction, but in cooking, it's not just about the heat eh. It should always be the right amount at the right time.

For a year hindi ako nakapag pancakes because the induction stove makes the pans too hot. I tried (and failed) twice. For a year, hindi din ako nakapag tortang talong kasi walang apoy na pwedeng pag ihawan ng talong (I'm a condo dweller so no room for charcoal; and I'm not a fan of tortang talong na nilalaga ang talong).

I also don't like the fact that I can't use cookware other than those made of thin stainless. I'm still keeping the induction stove for emergency purposes though. But for now, I'll throw a pancake party muna!

joey81
07-26-2012, 01:15 PM
^Wag naman po natin ibaon sa limot ang thread. It's very informative hehe.

I'm going back to LPG after a year of using induction stove. Madali uminit ang induction, but in cooking, it's not just about the heat eh. It should always be the right amount at the right time.

For a year hindi ako nakapag pancakes because the induction stove makes the pans too hot. I tried (and failed) twice. For a year, hindi din ako nakapag tortang talong kasi walang apoy na pwedeng pag ihawan ng talong (I'm a condo dweller so no room for charcoal; and I'm not a fan of tortang talong na nilalaga ang talong).

I also don't like the fact that I can't use cookware other than those made of thin stainless. I'm still keeping the induction stove for emergency purposes though. But for now, I'll throw a pancake party muna!

I understand your frustrations. I noticed that when I set the stove to low power (3 and below), the "heating element" turns on and off. The duration of ON and OFF states vary. Shorter ON time and longer OFF time for level 1, and so on.

This is noticable if you're using the thin stainless cookware. Using cookware with thick bottoms will help "regulate" or even out the bursts of heat. In the ON state, not all of the heat generated goes to the food. Some of it dissipates into the thick bottom of the cookware. In the OFF state on the heat captured by the bottom will continue the cooking.

Much like a capacitor in an electronic circuit. Or an overhead tank of water.

That means ako lang ang pwedeng magluto ng pancake. Hehehe.

angeljolie
07-26-2012, 04:54 PM
^Unfortunately, my induction cooker (Dowell) couldn't handle thicker pans. Some of my pans have holes already because they're too thin.

Nelson de Leon
07-31-2012, 10:06 PM
Kaya ako, high pressure stove and wok for cooking. Simply the best!

Wanderlust
08-30-2012, 01:02 PM
Hi. We just bought a Dowell induction cooker (with free magnetic steel pan). When we first use it (my husband and I are newbies to inductions), the egg we were frying burnt. I notice that upon switching the cooker on the heat starts at 200'celsius, even if we adjust the heat to it's lowest (60'celsius) the heat quickly transfers to the pan that causes the egg to cook fast and burn fast. :( Ganto ba talaga? Or we need to get thicker pan? TIA

owyn
08-30-2012, 03:50 PM
It appears that it is one uncontestable disadvantage in induction cookers: it's imperative to invest in good cookware. It's almost a universal rule of thumb: the heavier it is, the better it is. ...That's a rather nice way of putting it: like a capacitor =). Collects a jittery input and delivers a smooth output. No hotspots.

I'm using "affordable" sunnex and i notice that one side consistently has burn marks when i stir fry the aromatics (onions, ginger, or garlic.) Maybe the way magnetic metal was "clad" into the stainless bottom was uneven. (There's actually a brand called "all-clad" that takes pride in how they joined together copper, cast iron, or maybe aluminum with an outside shell of stainless steel.) For evenness in cooking (no burnt spots,) cast iron would be the undisputed king (our old rice cooker was a provincial style thick untreated cast iron, worked well even when used with the uneven fires of wood.) "Seasoned" cast iron are available at gourdo's or sm department stores- the brand is Lodge. Colorful, more user friendly "Enameled" cast iron are available at this one store in shang, some german stuff i don't recall; dunno if french le creuset is available locally- bacchus? Geeez.... HEAVY both in physical weight and in the wallet cast iron cookware are though.

On bigger Lock and Lock stores, they have these stainless steel pans that are not as good as the cast iron stuff but noticeablely better than sunnex or freebie pans. For nonstick, Tefal has a a line called "preference" available at sm department store or landmark. If I ever upgraged my users, i think these are what i'll get.


===========
Personal experience: Induction has changed my life for the better. It's easier to clean. The timer is a safety feature and i can leave it unattended (but i know that's bad practice.)

I want my hard boiled eggs with a wet yolk. I haven't put it down to a science yet but i have more success now: 1 liter of water in the casserole pan, 800 watts, 12 minutes. The process is impressively sensitive: If the eggs aren't taken off immediately and left to cook from residual heat, the yolk will solidify. If the eggs are rather small, there will a thin outer layer of solidified yolk but with a gooey center . Do it at noon when the tap water is warm, majority of the yolk has turned into a crumbly texture. Rather than experimenting with 400 watts, i just take off 2 minutes off the cooking time when i think it needs to.

Happy cooking everyone :cool01:

vrcinfo
09-05-2012, 12:40 AM
We've been using our Imarflex induction cooker since March of this year and so far we're satisfied. We even cook rice on it using a pressure cooker and its very fast. Five minutes of cooking upon boiling then turn it off. The rice will cook by itself perfectly. On the side, our LPG is on standby for brownouts and inihaw na talong. 90% of time its induction for us. Cost wise we save approximately P200 monthly compared to fulltime LPG cooking.

wool
09-06-2012, 02:22 PM
yun propane stove na galing US pwede ba sa local LPG tanks natin? or kailangan pa ng conversion sa adaptor lang.

willyfernando
09-06-2012, 04:03 PM
yun propane stove na galing US pwede ba sa local LPG tanks natin? or kailangan pa ng conversion sa adaptor lang.

They are like the ones being used by Shellane or Manila gas. Universal model ang LPG regulator nyan.

shampooking
09-09-2012, 06:11 AM
I had my imarflex induction stove for over a year now and I'm very satisfied. I use thick bottomed pans for cooking. Btw, there's a Kyowa model out in the market that has it's lowest power setting at 40 watts (mine is only at 400 watts- yes, thin bottomed cookware is a no-no) so you can fry stuff without burning it.

Wanderlust
09-12-2012, 12:49 PM
^ hi, it seems that the solution to our problem is to buy thick bottomed pans. what brand or where did you get your thick bottomed pan? how much is it? thanks.

vrcinfo
03-07-2013, 05:16 PM
My Imarflex Induction cooker I bought March 2012 got defective. Displaying an E6 error and the glasstop came off. Its silicon glue gave way. I bought it for P3,048 then and the price is still the same today. Luckily I had its warranty extended, so I'll have it replaced with a brand new unit again. For my second unit I bought a kyowa brand for P950 only. The only drawback i encountered is its minimum setting is 400W. Its way above our minimum cooking setting of 150-200W. We'll just have to adjust the way we cook. My observations on induction cookers are remove your pots as soon as cooking is done. never leave the pot when hot on top of the glasstop, the plastic body at the bottom of the glasstop tends to melt on prolonged heat, when cooking is done turn off using the on/off button and wait until the cooling fan stop before unplugging. This will cool-off the body and circuitry. Always unplug when not in use. The circuit is sensitive to power surges and gets damage easily.

vrcinfo
03-22-2013, 11:41 AM
I've found cheap cookwares that works with induction cookers. At Waltermart's Japan Home Depot. Their pans are made of ferrous metal. I thought this is a good alternative then buying those expensive cookwares for induction cooker. To double check it just grab some of their magnets on sale and stick it to the cookware. If its magnetized then surely it will work for induction cooker. Price is less than P100, glass cover sold separately for the same price. Tried it already and cooks just fine.