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  • Self-leveling compound

    We'll be using HDF laminates for our flooring. Our concrete sub-floor is not level, there are
    some low spots. From what I've read around, this is going to be a problem.

    One way to solve it is to pour self-leveling compound on the low spots. Anyone had any experience with this material? Any local source?

    TIA!

  • #2
    Re: Self-leveling compound

    Originally posted by joey81 View Post
    We'll be using HDF laminates for our flooring. Our concrete sub-floor is not level, there are
    some low spots. From what I've read around, this is going to be a problem.

    One way to solve it is to pour self-leveling compound on the low spots. Anyone had any experience with this material? Any local source?

    TIA!
    cement based self level compounds are recommended as >3mm toppings - which means you apply the minimum 3mm over the whole area.
    if you use it to correct low spots, you might have a problem with feather edges - they will be weak points (might crack even under your HDF laminates). or you should apply acrylic bonding agent before you pour the self level compound.
    self level epoxies shouldn't have any problem on the feather edges because they are definitely stronger and has stronger adhesion.
    denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
    industry standard cost effective specifications

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Self-leveling compound

      Thanks for the inputs, pinoychem! Would you happen to know where can I purchase either type?

      And BTW, welcome to PHM!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Self-leveling compound

        Originally posted by joey81 View Post
        Thanks for the inputs, pinoychem! Would you happen to know where can I purchase either type?

        And BTW, welcome to PHM!!
        thank you for the welcome.
        for imported brands, you can try sika, fosroc, bostik, and parex davco (not necessarily arranged according to quality and/or price). they should be easy to look up in the web.

        may i ask are you an applicator/contractor?
        denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
        industry standard cost effective specifications

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Self-leveling compound

          I'm a homeowner DIYer. I need to level-off a few low spots in our house. Total area is maybe 1 to 2 square meters.

          Do you know the local distributors of the brands you mentioned? Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Self-leveling compound

            Originally posted by joey81 View Post
            I'm a homeowner DIYer. I need to level-off a few low spots in our house. Total area is maybe 1 to 2 square meters.

            Do you know the local distributors of the brands you mentioned? Thanks!
            sika is in las pinas near alabang zapote road. fosroc is in dela paz pasig. and parex davco is near c5 ugong pasig.

            how thick is your 1 to 2 square meters? how many millimeters?

            i'm not sure if the above imported ones carry stock or if they will import just 1bag of cement based self level for you.
            for a small area, it would be easier to buy low viscosity epoxy (the ones used for crack injection) and pour it on your low spots - which should be clean and dry. epoxy injection should cost between P1,000 to P2,000 per gallon.
            oh and the self level cost around P1,000 for a 25kg bag which should yield 13Liters (estimate) of self level compound.

            hope this helps.
            denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
            industry standard cost effective specifications

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Self-leveling compound

              Thanks for the leads, pinoychem.

              Estimated average depths of the low areas is 5mm.

              Is this low-viscosity epoxy the same one used to repair road cracks? Maybe it can also be used to repair the cracks in the concrete topping of my roofdeck.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Self-leveling compound

                Maki-ride rin ako. Where can one get the low-viscosity epoxy? I get epoxy resins from Polymer Products in Pasig (Joe Borris, off C5). Would that be the same?
                Posted via PHM Mobile

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Self-leveling compound

                  Originally posted by joey81 View Post
                  Thanks for the leads, pinoychem.

                  Estimated average depths of the low areas is 5mm.

                  Is this low-viscosity epoxy the same one used to repair road cracks? Maybe it can also be used to repair the cracks in the concrete topping of my roofdeck.
                  the low viscosity epoxy injection used for hairline to 10mm road cracks can also be used as a self level grout. the key is surface preparation - the surface should be clean and super dry.

                  1sqm @ 1mm = 1Liter.
                  so for 1sqm @ 5mm you will need 5Liters of epoxy injection material.

                  and yes, epoxy injection would be the best solution for your roofdeck cracks.

                  and the best waterproofing for roofdecks is a system of polyurethane primer + 500% elongation polyurethane @ minimum 3mm thickness + polyurethane topcoat. just recoat the topcoat every 5years and the system should last 40 to 50years. but this should be in another thread...
                  denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
                  industry standard cost effective specifications

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Self-leveling compound

                    Originally posted by balarila View Post
                    Maki-ride rin ako. Where can one get the low-viscosity epoxy? I get epoxy resins from Polymer Products in Pasig (Joe Borris, off C5). Would that be the same?
                    Posted via PHM Mobile
                    low viscosity (two component) epoxy injection should be structural grade - greater than 10,000psi and 100% solids (no shrinkage)

                    is the one from Polymer Phils packed in gallons, and how much per gallon?

                    in the telephone directory, look for suppliers under construction chemicals
                    denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
                    industry standard cost effective specifications

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Self-leveling compound

                      Originally posted by pinoychem View Post
                      low viscosity (two component) epoxy injection should be structural grade - greater than 10,000psi and 100% solids (no shrinkage)

                      is the one from Polymer Phils packed in gallons, and how much per gallon?

                      in the telephone directory, look for suppliers under construction chemicals
                      Sorry, let me correct myself. I get fiberglass cloth from Polymer; I have friends who buy their epoxy resins (for boatbuilding).

                      They sell resins in two parts by the gallon. Each gallon is about P1.5k+. Ratio of mixing is 1:2. But epoxy resins shrink. That's why we pour them proud when filling gaps or holes (e.g. making bushings).

                      In another message, you mentioned polyurethane as deck waterproofing. Why not epoxy? (question, not a suggestion).

                      You are right that this should be in another thread. There is one here. Do you mind posting your suggestion re waterproofing in that thread?

                      I have a lot of tiled decks in my house and many are leaking. I will probaly have them torn off next summer and put waterproofing. Since this is a costly and grossly inconvenient exercise, I'd like to do it right and for good. Thanks.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Self-leveling compound

                        Originally posted by pinoychem View Post
                        low viscosity (two component) epoxy injection should be structural grade - greater than 10,000psi and 100% solids (no shrinkage)
                        is the one from Polymer Phils packed in gallons, and how much per gallon?
                        Is it possible to be 'low viscosity' and 100% solids? Aren't viscosity and %-solids correlated? It seems that the 100% solids epoxies I've encountered tend to be so viscous that thinning is required not optional.

                        The Polymer Products epoxy is called 'laminating' epoxy and is specified to be for 'laminating' applications. No psi or %-solids spec.

                        Another epoxy I tried is Pioneer EFC which is specified to be for 'concrete topping and repair' but has been reported used for laminating with good results. No psi or %-solids spec either.

                        Are these 'laminating' or 'concrete' application designations mostly arbitrary/interchangeable?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Self-leveling compound

                          Originally posted by balarila View Post
                          Sorry, let me correct myself. I get fiberglass cloth from Polymer; I have friends who buy their epoxy resins (for boatbuilding).

                          They sell resins in two parts by the gallon. Each gallon is about P1.5k+. Ratio of mixing is 1:2. But epoxy resins shrink. That's why we pour them proud when filling gaps or holes (e.g. making bushings).

                          In another message, you mentioned polyurethane as deck waterproofing. Why not epoxy? (question, not a suggestion).

                          You are right that this should be in another thread. There is one here. Do you mind posting your suggestion re waterproofing in that thread?

                          I have a lot of tiled decks in my house and many are leaking. I will probaly have them torn off next summer and put waterproofing. Since this is a costly and grossly inconvenient exercise, I'd like to do it right and for good. Thanks.
                          structural crack injection epoxies sold by gallon set of base and hardener are priced at P1300 - P1700. depends from which manufacturer you will buy. sorry if i wish to refrain from endorsing a manufacturer but they should be easy to find under construction chemicals in the yellow pages. structural crack injection epoxies aren't supposed to shrink because their purpose is to fill all the voids in a crack or gap that you are repairing. that's why i suggested it as a self leveling material if the area is only small (because epoxy is expensive when compared to cement based leveling compound - for bigger areas).

                          re answering your waterproofing question of why not epoxy, let me try to look for the link and answer it there. if not, perhaps you can start another waterproofing thread titled 'pu vs epoxy waterproofing'. you probably need not be inconvenienced and tear off your tiles... then again, please start the new thread
                          denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
                          industry standard cost effective specifications

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Self-leveling compound

                            Originally posted by guad View Post
                            Is it possible to be 'low viscosity' and 100% solids? Aren't viscosity and %-solids correlated? It seems that the 100% solids epoxies I've encountered tend to be so viscous that thinning is required not optional.

                            The Polymer Products epoxy is called 'laminating' epoxy and is specified to be for 'laminating' applications. No psi or %-solids spec.

                            Another epoxy I tried is Pioneer EFC which is specified to be for 'concrete topping and repair' but has been reported used for laminating with good results. No psi or %-solids spec either.

                            Are these 'laminating' or 'concrete' application designations mostly arbitrary/interchangeable?
                            come to think of it, you are right. low viscosity and 100% solids sounds contradicting.
                            but it's not.

                            100% solids means the mixture of epoxy base and hardener did not use conventional solvent that will evaporate and thus will result to shrinkage. that's why the term - solvent free.

                            probably the Pioneer EFC stands for Epoxy Floor Coating? your friendly Pioneer rep should be able to provide you the specs psi and solids content. if you insist on it before buying.

                            my guess is - laminating is different from concrete.
                            denser stronger sealed & protected concrete
                            industry standard cost effective specifications

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi! I wanted to do an industrial floor design in my 78.2 sqm area in the living room so I asked my contractor to do concrete floors. After concrete dried, I saw several defects.

                              1. First, the colors are uneven especially between the "dugtungan" and there are some darker patches of that doesnt match the other areas.
                              2. I noticed cracks (some hairline and some bigger) between the dugtungan and in many other parts. Knocked on it and some seemed more solid than others.
                              3. When we poured water, noticed uneven even areas as well.
                              My questions is:

                              What is the best and cost-effective solution for these concerns?

                              1. should i put another layer of concrete to level it, get the color right and get rid of the cracks?
                              -- a friend suggested marble dust--- it that good?
                              --or, should I just apply self levelling cement on top (as previously suggested in one of the threads)
                              --what type of materials do i need?

                              2. OR, leave it as is and have cracks repaired, apply hardener, concrete stain and concrete sealer.. and hope that the cracks will not get as bigger..

                              Help!

                              Comment

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