Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

    I just recently learned from an acquaintance that there is a thermal fuse in electric fans.

    Now, I also do home repairs on my electric fans, and never thought about thermal fuse in them.

    However, I have read and heard also how homes got burned down owing to a stuck up electric fan catching fire from overheating.

    So, I have been thinking of buying thermal fuses and and installing them myself in my electric fans; but I have to find out first whether fans sold in the Philippines are required by law to also have thermal fuse already connected inside.

    Any information from diy guys here?




    Yrreg

  • #2
    Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

    Originally posted by Yrreg View Post
    ... whether fans sold in the Philippines are required by law to also have thermal fuse already connected inside....
    I think the law may not reach that far - as to regulating fan internals in a market where McGuyver is king - jk, but I have a hate/hate relationship with fans...

    Seems that the budget units (16" - 18" models under 1.5k peso sold in the local malls) have to be serviced about every 6 months... with daily use.

    Capicitors and fuses are common to go. You will notice them start to spin slower... then you know its service time...

    about 300 peso from the neighborhood fan repair shop... or about 100 peso if you get both parts yourself from a place like RAON Quiapo.



    Its a 5 minute job.. but cleaning the dust out of the unit.... that's the time consuming part....

    Hope this helps at least a little...

    NOTE: I have seen the fire hazards as 2 fans left in a rental house were recently tested.. and BOTH started spitting out sparks within 2 weeks of use... good thing they were sitting against concrete walls AND someone was near to yank the cord...
    Last edited by savadious; 04-21-2014, 10:20 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

      It seems that the US does not require either that thermal fuse be installed in electric fans.

      Read this conclusion on a study from a US government report on safety of portable electric fans:



      http://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/109224/hazardupdate.pdf


      So, to play safe, better install thermal fuse in my home fans.




      Yrreg

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electrical fans sold in the Philippines?

        So, finally I bought two thermal fuses for my fans, at Deeco in Farmers Plaza, Cubao.

        Each costs 15 pesos; the salesgirl told me they have only one kind, for electric fans at home.

        It looks like a very small size resistor or capacitor but the shell of the fuse is very fragile.

        I already installed one fuse, in the fan I use in the bed room, which I leave on the whole night while I sleep.


        This is the way to install the thermal fuse:*
        1. With the cable coming out from the switch box of the fan, and which you connect to the electrical outlet in your wall, first take its plug out of the wall outlet, don't skip this part as you value your life and health.

        2. Allow say 3 inches from the switch box of the fan, this space is needed for a work area when you start stripping the insulation from one wire of this cable.

        3. At this point 3 inches away from the fan switch box, insert the blade of your small knife -- a pocket knife will do and it must be sharp -- into the joining line space between the two wires of the cable, slit some 2.5 inches in the direction away from the fan, thus separating the two wires.

        4. Strip off the insulation of one wire up to 2.5 inches length in the direction away from the fan, leave the other wire alone.

        5. Now lay the fuse along the length of the exposed part of the wire, so the fuse component itself is in the middle of the exposed part of the wire.

        6. Cut through in the middle of the exposed wire, DON'T CUT YET THE WIRES FROM THE THERMAL FUSE.

        7. Now you have two ends to each of which you will twist-join each of the two wires from the fuse, so that their combined length will equal the length of the corresponding length of the un-stripped wire.

        8. Okay, start twist-joining in this way: coil forward one wire from the fuse securely around the exposed part of the wire up to its unexposed point, do the same with the other wire from the fuse -- do a trial first.

        9. Make sure that there is no extending bulge in the combined length of the exposed wire parts and the thermal fuse, and also no bulge in the untouched wire of the cable from the fan switch -- you get the idea, both lines must be equal.*

        10. When there is no bulge in either line, then you cut off the excess in the exposed wire parts and the excess in the wires from the fuse 'bead'.

        11. Now you wrap around with electrical insulation tape as to cover both wires: the one with the thermal fuse and the one untouched, so that in particular no part of the wire with the fuse is exposed.

        12. Turn on the switch of the fan -- no electrical current yet present at this point in time, and move the fan away to a safe spot, then insert the plug of the fan's cable into the wall electrical outlet.

        13. If nothing happens, neither the fan blade propeller starts rotating, nor any sparks nor smoke nor odor of burning occur, then your thermal fuse is bad i.e. not working, or you have not made the installation correctly, or there is no current from the outlet.

        14. To ascertain whether there is current from the outlet, get another fan and connect it to the outlet; if the fan works, then the trouble is not with no current from the outlet, see No. 13 above.

        15. In which case, do not reconnect the fan being serviced, check your work all over again, following the instructions carefully.*

        *Do this job at your own risk, if you don't understand an instruction or can't imagine what went wrong, call me, 351-8168, Yrreg.

        If you have a hard time with my instructions, I can understand that as I don't do this everyday.



        Yrreg

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

          nice diy, bibili din ako ng thermal fuses soon.

          kanina ng linis ako ng isang deskfan,nagulat ako at ma itim na ang mga wires/insulators. mukang sunog na kaya tinabi nalang for parts..

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

            I just recently learned from an acquaintance that there is a thermal fuse in electric fans.
            Yeah learned this also just last week, One of the wall fan stuck up, about 3 weeks ago, I did put oil in the bearing it work for about 2 more weeks, suddenly just died, I was about to throw it, when I decided to consult Youtube and found out that there is a fuse in the motor, I temporary put a small fuse but I'm afraid that the ampere is high and it might not blow up in case it overheat again, I'm going to buy the right fuse this coming weekend.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Thermal fuse, is it in electric fans sold in the Philippines?

              Bought the fuse from Deecoo today, it cost 20php a piece.

              Comment


              • #8
                How would you determine the correct value of the thermal fuse and that it matches the fan?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes, Camel & KDK electric fan has it.

                  Comment

                  Related Articles

                  Collapse

                  Collapse
                  • Filter
                  • Time
                  • Show
                  • New Topics
                  Clear All
                  new posts
                  No content found
                  Show More
                  • Filter
                  • Time
                  • Show
                  • New Topics
                  Clear All
                  new posts
                  Please log in to your account to view your subscribed posts.

                  Related Articles

                  Collapse

                  Working...
                  X